Communication Hubris

From the Googles:


hu·bris
/ˈ(h)yo͞obrəs/

noun

excessive pride or self-confidence.
synonyms: arrogance, conceit, haughtiness, hauteur, pride, self-importance,
egotism, pomposity, superciliousness, superiority; More
antonyms: humility

(in Greek tragedy) excessive pride toward or defiance of the gods, leading to
nemesis.


Just when I think that I’m a great communicator, life enlightens me and shows me that I am deluded. This enlightenment usually takes the form of a small child.

You really have to be a great communicator to help children understand things. Not even ethereal concepts. Just ordinary things. Like hats.

TODDLER
              (pointing to one of many caps in the closet) 
Hat.

GREAT COMMUNICATOR
Yes, that's a hat.

TODDLER 
  (pointing again to another cap) 
Hat.

GREAT COMMUNICATOR
Yes, that is also a hat.

TODDLER
 (pointing to yet another cap) 
Hat.

GREAT COMMUNICATOR
          That is a hat as well. I could add that 
           the hat is actually a cap, but we'll get 
            into subsets when you're older. Actually, 
            each hat you've pointed to is technically 
 a cap. But there are some hats 
hanging in the closet as well.

TODDLER
(pointing to first cap)
Hat.

GREAT COMMUNICATOR
Sorry: yes, that is a hat.

TODDLER RUNS OFF TO PLAY WITH SOMEONE SMARTER.

I wonder whether my youngest child would be better served by me just shutting the heck up. I’m not a poor communicator. Most of the time, anyway. I’m actually a pretty decent communicator. I make a living at it, for crying out loud.

It’s just that I’m not in the 90th percentile. My child reminds me that, on a good day, I’m solidly entrenched in the 60th percentile.

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About scotmarvin

Scot is a writer for Oracle. He's a slacker and smartass involved in content strategy, content architecture, big data, cloud computing, and other buzzwords related to technical stuff. He loves his family, history books, jazz guitar, and the Minnesota Vikings. Scot is a proud father, so don't make the mistake of asking about his family unless you have four hours to listen to him ramble on about his kids.
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